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Alcohol-induced liver disease is commonly referred to as alcoholic hepatitis. It is the inflammation of the liver caused by drinking alcohol. This is most likely to occur in people who drink so much through many years.

However, the relationship between drinking and alcohol-induced liver disease is complex as not all heavy drinkers develop this disease condition.  Ironically, this condition can occur in moderate drinkers.

HOW DOES ALCOHOL-INDUCED LIVER DISEASE HAPPEN?

For ease in understanding this process, the art below explains the different stages of Alcohol-Induced Liver disease.

 

RISK FACTORS OF ALCOHOL-INDUCED LIVER DISEASE

As earlier stated, alcohol-induced liver disease doesn’t occur in all people who excessively use alcohol, some factors that lead to its development include;

  1. Previous history of some liver disorders such as hemochromatosis, hepatitis B and hepatitis C.
  2. Obesity
  3. Sex: Women are at a greater risk of developing alcohol-induced liver disease compared to men due to the differences in how the bodies of men and women absorb and break down alcohol.
  4. Genetic factors: This explains how different person’s body processes alcohol.
  5. Time of Ingestion: Persons who drink alcohol at any time are at much risk of developing this disease compared to those who drink alcohol during meal times.

SYMPTOMS OF ALCOHOL-INDUCED LIVER DISEASE

The symptoms depend on its severity. Below are some symptoms of the disease;

  1. Nausea and vomiting
  2. Pain or swelling in the abdomen
  3. Jaundice, or yellowing of the skin and eyes
  4. Changes in appetite
  5. Consistent fever
  6. Changes in your mental state, including confusion
  7. Fatigue
  8. Easy bleeding or bruising
  9. Drastic weight loss
  10. Dry mouth

PREVENTION OF ALCOHOL-INDUCED LIVER DISEASE

To reduce the risk of alcohol-induced liver disease, you should:

  1. Reduce intake of alcohol, moderate drinkers (one bottle daily) are at lower risk of developing cirrhosis.
  2. People already diagnosed of hepatitis C should stop drinking alcohol as their chances of developing cirrhosis is higher than that of other persons.
  3. Always read the warning labels on over-the-counter medications in other to note if congestion of alcohol as well as the medication purchased will cause any adverse effect. As much as you can, avoid taking alcohol alongside prescription drugs or confirm from your physician.